What Can You Do With A Business Degree?

Liz Heintz

Written By: Liz Heintz

Published: 5/5/2022

If you're considering earning a bachelor's degree in business, it helps to look at what that may mean for your future career. Companies of all kinds hire graduates to make sure their organizations run smoothly and efficiently to reach their goals. As a result, they rely on the organizational, administrative, and leadership skill sets graduates bring, as well as the expertise a degree concentration may provide. Graduates can apply for a variety of career options within the business world supporting a company's financial health, facility operations, staffing needs, and public image. Business degree graduates often work in healthcare, finance, nonprofit, marketing, and tech industries.

Find an Online Degree:
Find an Online Degree:

What Is a Business Degree?

The curriculum of a bachelor's degree program introduces students to business concepts, such as accounting, human resources (HR), marketing, and communications, and how each integrates in the day-to-day operations of an organization. Most programs take full-time students an average of four years to complete 120 credit hours. You can choose from numerous bachelor's degrees in business and related fields:

You may be able to choose a concentration within each degree based on occupations and industries of interest. For example, an accounting student may concentrate on insurance or banking. Similarly, a marketing major may choose to focus on digital or global marketing, and an HR major may choose to focus on benefits and compensation or labor law.

Why Earn A Business Degree?

Earning a business degree can give you a competitive edge in the marketplace by showing employers that you have formally developed skills that meet industry standards. It may enable you to nimbly switch from entry-level to advanced careers, move between departments, or switch companies and industries. A business education can help you increase your career opportunities by allowing you to apply your knowledge and practical skills to many settings. As you earn your degree, you'll gain the ability to network with others, potentially leading to job opportunities after graduation and beyond. It can also prepare you for further study if you choose to earn a master's degree, such as an MBA, for more senior leadership roles.



A business degree may enable you to nimbly switch from entry-level to advanced careers, move between departments, or switch companies and industries.

However, it is important to keep in mind that business degree graduates who don't specialize or choose a concentration may face stiff competition in the job market — schools conferred over 387,000 bachelor's degrees in business in 2020, the most of any discipline. Therefore, you may want to consider a specialization, such as finance, marketing, or human resources, and decide if you want to work in a for-profit, nonprofit, private or public sector. Deciding on a focus can help you become a subject area expert and may increase your marketability.

Top Business Degree Jobs

The careers graduates enter after earning their business degrees are often as diverse as the degrees themselves. The skills gained through coursework can be applied in a variety of settings within most industries. Below, we've identified several occupations that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects to show strong job growth through 2030. We've included national statistics, but you can continue to research each career on the BLS to hone in on data that's specific to your geographic area. Top industries and employer data is provided by data analytics company, Burning Glass Technologies.

Administrative Services and Facilities Manager

Median Annual Salary: $99,920

Job Outlook: 9%

Administrative services and facilities managers ensure organizations and their facilities operate efficiently. These trained professionals often oversee various departments and systems within a company. For an administrative services manager, this may mean overseeing business operations by planning and coordinating processes such as recordkeeping, procurement, technology use, and customer service. A facility manager may be responsible for overseeing the staff who ensure the mechanical and electrical systems that keep a building functioning are correctly maintained. They may also manage renovation projects to meet environmental, health, and security standards.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's Degree

Top Industries: Real Estate and leasing, educational services, healthcare and social assistance

Top Employers: CBRE Group, Jones Lang Leslie Incorporated, Cushman & Wakefield

Similar Occupations: Administrative Coordinator, Administrative Manager, Business Administrator, Business Manager, Operations Manager, General Manager

Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Manager

Median Annual Salary: $133,380

Job Outlook: 10%

Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers create and implement programs to generate business and draw customers. They may work across departments to discuss budgets, marketing strategies, and select advertising media, while others may perform the work themselves for smaller organizations. Advertising and marketing managers often work with sales staff to brainstorm ideas for campaigns and oversee the team that creates the advertising. They often specialize in a particular field of advertising, such as radio, television, newspapers, magazine, or social media.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree

Top Industries: Professional and Technical Services, Finance and Insurance, Manufacturing

Top Employers: Microsoft Corporation, Anthem Blue Cross, JP Morgan Chase Company, Microsoft Corporation

Similar Occupations: Marketing Manager, Promotions Manager, Account Executive, Communications Director, Creative Services Director, Advertising Manager, Advertising Sales Manager

Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialist

Median Annual Salary: $64,120

Job Outlook: 10%

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists ensure that employees receive fair and equitable compensation for their work. They often research compensation and benefit plans throughout an industry to ensure an organization is competitive. These specialists create employee benefits and pay structures and complete routine assessments to make sure compensation packages align with an organization's goals and objectives. In addition, they ensure compliance with state and federal regulations regarding pay, overtime, and workers' compensation.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree

Top Industries: Finance and insurance, healthcare and social assistance, professional and technical services

Top Employers: Anthem Blue Cross, Guidehouse, Deloitte

Similar Occupations: Benefits Administrator, Benefits Analyst, Compensation Analyst, Compensation Consultant

Financial Manager

Median Annual Salary: $131,710

Job Outlook: 17%

Financial managers oversee an organization's financial health by using their expertise in their industry's tax laws and regulations and the interpretation of financial data. They prepare and analyze financial statements and business forecasts for organizational leaders to make informed monetary decisions. Financial managers develop an organization's long-term economic plan by analyzing market trends. Some of these managers are also in charge of investments and finding ways to raise capital to meet these financial goals. They may also oversee the staff who do financial reporting and budgeting.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree

Top Industries: Finance and insurance, professional and technical services, manufacturing

Top Employers: Humana, Deloitte, KPMG

Similar Occupations: Controller, Credit Manager, Risk Manager, Finance Officer, Treasurer, Insurance Manager, Cash Manager

Human Resources Manager

Median Annual Salary: $126,230

Job Outlook: 9%

Human resources (HR) managers oversee the administrative functions of an organization by recruiting, interviewing, and hiring staff. They develop ways to attract new employees and motivate existing teams. HR managers administer employee-related services such as payroll, training, and benefits, and manage those responsible for ensuring all of these tasks are completed accurately and on time. Departmental managers and other organization leaders often consult with HR managers to resolve employee disputes or other issues that impact the hiring and retention of personnel.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree, though some may require a master's degree in human resources, labor relations, or business (MBA)

Top Industries: Professional and technical services, Healthcare and Social Assistance, manufacturing

Top Employers: Deloitte, Anthem Blue Cross, Bausch & Lomb

Similar Occupations: Labor Relations Director, Employee Relations Manager, Payroll Managers, Recruitment and Staffing Managers

Management Analyst

Median Annual Salary: $93,000

Job Outlook: 14%

Management analysts work in various industries and organizations researching ways to improve efficiency — some are directly employed by a business, while others are entrepreneurs and work on a consulting basis. They gather and analyze information to develop new ways to conduct business which they recommend to organizational leadership. Management analysts often run surveys and interview employees for feedback on policies and procedures to include in their analysis. Many specialize by industry, such as healthcare or telecommunications for example.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree

Top Industries: Finance and insurance, professional and technical services, manufacturing

Top Employers: Anthem Blue Cross, UnitedHealth Group, Wells Fargo

Similar Occupations: Business Analyst, Healthcare Business Analyst, Management Consultant, Administrative Analyst, Organizational Development Consultant

Medical and Health Services Manager

Median Annual Salary: $101,340

Job Outlook: 32%

Medical and health services managers oversee medical and health services in clinics, nursing homes, hospitals, and physician offices. Their goal is to improve the efficiency and delivery of healthcare services. In larger organizations, these healthcare managers may oversee individual departments. Therefore, keeping up to date on healthcare laws, regulations, and technology is imperative to make sure organizations comply with current industry standards.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree, though master's degrees are becoming increasingly common with employers

Top Industries: Healthcare and social assistance, finance and insurance, professional and technical services

Top Employers: Hospital Corporation of America, Guidehouse, Anthem Blue Cross, Westat

Similar Occupations: Nursing Home Administrator, Clinical Manager, Health Information Manager, Healthcare Executive, Healthcare Administrator

Operations Research Analyst

Median Annual Salary: $82,360

Job Outlook: 25%

Operations research analysts use advanced mathematical and statistical skills to assist with problem-solving within organizations, such as healthcare, business, and logistics. Once solutions are identified, these analysts present findings to organizational leaders to make the right business decisions. They are technically savvy and may use sophisticated software to compile information to troubleshoot and problem solve. These operations analysts often work in teams with experts in other disciplines to address a wide range of potential outcomes.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree, though some employers prefer a master's degree

Top Three Industries: Finance and insurance, professional and technical services, manufacturing

Top Employers: Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Deloitte

Similar Occupations: Advanced Analytics Associate, Analytical Strategist, Decision Analyst, Optimization Analyst

Public Relations Specialist

Median Annual Salary: $62,800

Job Outlook: 11%

Public relations (PR) specialists maintain an organization's positive public image. They have strong communication skills, are influential public speakers, and generally write well. PR specialists may craft speeches and press releases and serve as a media point of contact for interviews. They may evaluate proposed advertising and marketing campaigns before implementing them to ensure they reflect an organization's mission and image accurately. PR specialists serve a similar role in government and are often referred to as press secretaries.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree

Top Industries: Professional and technical services, educational services, finance and insurance

Top Employers: Deloitte, University of California, Anthem Blue Cross

Similar Occupations: Communication Specialist, Corporate Communications Specialist, Media Relations Specialist, Public Affairs Specialist, Public Information Specialist, Public Information Officer, Public Relations Coordinator

Public Relations and Fundraising Manager

Median Annual Salary: $119,860

Job Outlook: 13%

Public relations and fundraising managers often work with religious, civic, and grant-making organizations creating materials supporting an organization's public image. They may organize fundraising campaigns and activities to generate donations. Having strong written and verbal communication skills and ease with public speaking are integral as these managers often give voice to an organization by writing media and press releases and serving as the primary contact for media requests. PR managers may also supervise internal communications, including emails and company newsletters, and work with financial managers to produce budget reports.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree, though some require a master's degree in public relations, journalism, or nonprofit management

Top Industries: Educational services, other services (besides public administration), healthcare and social assistance

Top Employers: University of California, Anthem Blue Cross, American Heart Association Incorporated

Similar Occupations: Public Relations Manager, Fundraising Manager, Communications Director, Community Relations Director, Development Director, Communications Manager, Annual Giving Director

Training and Development Manager

Median Annual Salary: $120,130

Job Outlook: 11%

Training and development managers plan and coordinate programs that help staff. They are responsible for procuring or creating course materials to supplement training. These managers often oversee a team of training and development specialists who work to implement professional development programs. In addition, they often work with other department leaders to identify training needs and make sure these training priorities align with an organization's business and staffing goals.

Details:

Minimum Education Requirement: Bachelor's degree, though some employers may prefer a master's degree

Top Industries: Healthcare and social assistance, retail trade, manufacturing

Top Employers: Humana, Amazon, Danaher Corporation

Similar Occupations: Development Manager, Education and Development Manager, Learning and Development Director, Staff Training and Development Manager, Education Director, Learning Manager

The Bottom Line

Once you've enrolled in a business degree program, a program advisor or your school's career center staff can help you focus on your career path. You can also search sites such as LinkedIn to search organizations, view profiles of others in similar occupations, and identify job opportunities. We've only provided a snapshot of the careers you can choose from once you're ready to enter the job market. A degree in business can provide you with the foundational management skills to support a lifetime of work experience as you advance in your business career.

Related Articles

2022 Best Online Business Degree Programs

Explore the best accredited colleges offering online business degrees ranked based on alumni salary.

By the OnlineU team | 6/7/2022

What Can You Do with an Accounting Degree?

Learn about career options a degree in accounting might provide and what to consider when deciding whether accounting is a good fit for you.

By Ariel Kurtz | 4/27/2022

Guide to Online Business Management Degrees

Explore this guide to business management degrees to learn about common courses, careers for grads, scholarships, and if the degree is worth it.

By Michael McCarthy | 4/11/2022

ADVERTISEMENT

Start Your Online College Search:

Review schools that align with your career aspirations.

ADVERTISEMENT

Start Your Online College Search:

Review schools that align with your career aspirations.